Play Classic Sega Video Games Online

We offer 100% Free Online Web Browser Game Play of these classic Sega video games.

Back to Main List of all our Sega Games

Game and Console History:
The SG-1000 II, SG-3000, Sega Mark III & Sega Master are a home video game console manufactured by Sega. It was Sega’s first entry into the home video game hardware business. Introduced in 1983, the SG-1000 was released on the same day that Nintendo released the Family Computer in Japan. Sega’s software library for the SG-1000 comprises 42 game cartridges. The SG-1000 made little impact on the video game industry, but has been recognized for being Sega’s first video game console. The more powerful Sega Master console (1986) was released to compete with the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES).

Emulator instructions and keyboard controls towards bottom of page.

Champion Billiards


Controls
Click on Game Window to activate
X = Start Game and Main Button
Z = Secondary Button
Arrow Keys to Move

Instructions:
Click on the game window and hit the X key to start the game. If you grew up in the 80’s you shouldn’t need additional gameplay instructions.

Requirements:
These games are being emulated natively in Javascript. No plug-in is required in your web browser, but the emulator does require a modern web browser. They only run as good as your computer. If you have a fast, modern computer these games will run very smoothly.
Sorry, these games are not supported on Mobile devices like the Iphone.

Sega Master History
In North America, the Master System was launched in 1986 at a price of $200 (equivalent to $466 in 2019), including a multicart of the games Hang-On and Safari Hunt. Nintendo was exporting the Famicom to the US as the NES, and both companies planned to spend $15 million in late 1986 to market their consoles; Sega hoped to sell 400,000 to 750,000 consoles in 1986. By the end of 1986, 125,000 Master System consoles had been sold, more than the Atari 7800’s 100,000 but less than Nintendo’s 1.1 million.

As in Japan, the Master System in North America had a limited game library. Limited by Nintendo’s licensing practices, Sega only had two third-party American publishers, Activision and Parker Brothers. By 1988, Nintendo held 83 percent of the North American video game market. Sega claimed that the Master System was the first console “where the graphics on the box are actually matched by the graphics of the game”, and pushed the “arcade experience” in adverts. Its marketing department was run by only two people, giving Sega a disadvantage in advertising.

In 1987, amid struggling sales in the US, Sega sold the US distribution rights for the Master System to the toy company Tonka, which had no experience with electronic entertainment systems. During this time, much of Sega of America’s infrastructure shifted from marketing and distribution to focus on customer service. Tonka blocked localization of several popular Japanese games. Though the distributor of the console had changed, the Master System continued to perform poorly in the market.